Home/Upcoming Gigs

Fish Records Presents...

The best in folk, roots and acoustic music gigs

My Darling Clementine

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall

Saturday
Sep. 21


Doors at 19:30pm

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall
25 High Street
Eccleshall
Staffordshire
ST21 6BW
01785 850065

Saturday 21 Sep 2019

For what began life as something of a side project for Michael Weston King & Lou Dalgleish, a labour of love, a homage to the classic country duets of the 60’s and 70’s , My Darling Clementine is now very much part of the country and Americana landscape. 3 critically acclaimed albums, over 400 shows across Europe and N. America, numerous accolades and awards has placed the band at the forefront of the burgeoning Americana scene. But if the musical landscape has changed then the message and tone of the songs stay pretty constant. 2 adults, a man and woman, singing to each, about each other, for and against each other.

Rod Picott with support from Hope in High Water

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall

Saturday
Oct. 12


Doors at 19:30pm

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall
25 High Street
Eccleshall
Staffordshire
ST21 6BW
01785 850065

Saturday 12 Oct 2019

Fish Records to host Rod Picott . Eighteen years ago Rod Picott dropped his tool belt, picked up an acoustic guitar and released his first album Tiger Tom Dixon’s Blues. The acclaimed debut put a nail in the coffin of his construction career and ignited his second career as a singer-songwriter. Rod returns to the UK in support of brand new record Tell The Truth & Shame The Devil. Support comes from Hope in High Water, an Americana duo from Milton Keynes, UK whose distinctly British take on acoustic Americana has captivated audiences across the UK since early 2014. The music itself draws heavily on the lonesome, soulful influence of America’s musical traditions, reminiscent at times of the field songs of the South or the blues of the Delta and combining this with modern folk/Americana/country influences such as Justin Townes Earle, Shovels & Rope and Andrew Combs. Although heavily influenced by these traditions, Hope In High Water are acutely aware of their own roots, living in the urban town of Milton Keynes in middle England, a million miles from Route 66 or the romanticism of the American landscape. Instead they create something firmly grounded in their own experiences of the world and relevant to modern folk fans.

The Worry Dolls

Artisan Tap, Hartshill

Sunday
Nov. 03


Doors 19:00pm

Artisan Tap, Hartshill
552 Hartshill Road
Hartshill
Stoke-on-Trent
ST4 6AF
(01782) 618378

Sunday 03 Nov 2019

Fish Records and Biddulph Up In Arms are proud to present Worry Dolls with support from Hope In High Water. “The brilliantly quirky duo Worry Dolls – a super-shiny beacon of joy in a dreamland far, far away from the persistently ‘regular’ sound of folk that’s flooding the charts right now” • The Huffington Post Worry Dolls are an exciting duo born out of the joint talents of multi-instrumentalists Zoe Nicol and Rosie Jones. Serendipity brought Zoe and Rosie together at an open mic when they were 18, whilst studying music in Liverpool. Both redheads with guitars, on their chosen path of becoming solo singer songwriters, and both falling under the spell of ‘O Brother, Where Art Thou?’. Paired by their teachers for an opportunity to have their songwriting critiqued by Paul McCartney, they were inspired to start co-writing, and could now be described as an almost telepathically linked songwriting force. Discovering a unique chemistry and symbiotic vocal harmony with their voices, they set off together making music as Worry Dolls. It was a new sound, blending the tender urgency of Zoe’s Irish-influenced voice with the fiery integrity of Rosie’s vocals and rhythmic guitar. Zoe transferred her fingerpicking skills to ukulele, followed by Earl Scruggs-style banjo, motivated by players like Emily Robison (Dixie Chicks) and Winston Marshall (Mumford & Sons).� The pair were drawn to London, where they spent the best part of a year sleeping on couches, obsessively co-writing and performing, and all the while developing a burgeoning cult following. Worry Dolls harnessed this period of transition and channelled it into two EPs, with their second release “Burden” evidencing a sound that was beginning to shed its starry-eyed innocence, and give way to a more acerbic and mature artistic voice.� After a summer of grafting on the festival circuit, they made the decision to quit their day jobs & lives in London to fly to Nashville and record their debut album. They had a strong vision for the record even before it was fully written. The most important creative anchor was to stay true to their English roots and to work with people who could elaborate what they already had. It didn’t take long for personal recommendations to pair them with producer Neilson Hubbard, a veteran of East Nashville’s music scene with an ear for successful collaborations & a strong focus on vocals. It was soon obvious that the chemistry was mutual. In the 6 months following their album release, highlights include a raved-about main stage performance at Cambridge Folk Festival, showcases at The Great Escape and AmericanaFest UK, Festival La Truite Magique in Belgium, Jessie Weston’s catwalk at London Fashion Week, C2C Festival at The O2, BBC Introducing, plays on BBC Radio 2, praise from MOJO, BBC’s Whispering Bob Harris & Paul Sexton, opening slots and collaborations with Sam Outlaw and Mott the Hoople’s Ian Hunter. With support from Americana-duo Hope in High Water

Son of Town Hall

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall

Sunday
Nov. 17


Doors 19:30pm

The Royal Oak, Eccleshall
25 High Street
Eccleshall
Staffordshire
ST21 6BW
01785 850065

Sunday 17 Nov 2019

Welcome to the mythic world of Son of Town Hall, the unusual union of Ben Parker of London, England, and David Berkeley of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Parker, a highly sought-after London-based songwriter/producer/multi-instrumentalist, and Berkeley, a celebrated singer/songwriter/author have imagined a world that transcends time and space, complete with Victorian-era outfits, meditations about the sea and songs that beg you to sing along. The show is three-parts concert, one-part theater. It will leave you transformed, with your heart full of laughter and tears, drunk on adventure and the tragic beauty of the human condition. Son of Town Hall was born when the two found themselves side by side aboard a junk raft (“The Son of Town Hall”) crossing the mighty Atlantic in search of new lands, new inspiration, and to recover squandered fortune. The two have sailed their ship back a century or so, and their song and story cycle follows the pair across the open waters and from town to town as they travel the frontier bouncing primarily from one failed endeavor to another. Though they fall for temptation and countless false promises, their belief in humanity and each other never flags. Their struggles have only strengthened their harmony, a blend that would have made Simon and Garfunkel take to drink and push off to sea as well, had that duo been fortunate enough to hear Son of Town Hall sing. “Perhaps it was the solitude out there,” Parker explains when we caught up with the bearded duo off the coast of Maine, “or maybe it was the strong gratitude you feel for your companion as you make it through your first (or twelfth) near-death experience. Or maybe it was all the cheap rum we consumed... well whatever it was, we learned to sing out there. More importantly, we learned to sing together.” “You learn a lot on the high seas,” Berkeley adds. “Skills and endurance you didn’t know you possessed, you know?” We didn’t exactly know, but we let him continue. “Music and storytelling kept us afloat, kept us alive, really. That was the bond. We developed a blend and a sound that led even the sea creatures and the moon to pay attention. We just had to hope that it would translate if and when we ever reached the shore.” Well, as anyone at one of Son of Town Hall’s packed shows across America or Europe can attest, their sound has translated just fine. Audiences consistently leave a show swaying like they’ve been to sea themselves and muttering that they’ve never quite experienced something like it. If the early indications prove true, the two will soon need to build a bigger boat, for eveyone who floats near them wants to jump aboard.